Crocheting scarfs in Kudo Yarn

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Crochet class was great today; there was a good turnout of fun people to crochet with and a great scarf project.  There were 5 scarf patterns to choose from.  We made the scarf with Plymouth Yarn’s, Kudo.  Kudo is 55% cotton, 40% rayon, and 5% silk.  This is a great yarn.  The color choices are beautiful; and Kudo comes in variegated yarns that use the perfect color combination and finding a color you like is easy because the color palate covers are wide range to select from.  The yarn is an interesting yarn to work with because its thickness varies slightly as you work with it.

Here is my work in process:

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The class is held at The Knitters Edge in Bethlehem PA.  They have a lot of classes with a variety of times to fit everyone’s schedule.

What are you working on?  Do you have a favorite knitting/crocheting store?  What do you like about it?

 

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This has been a busy fiber arts weekend.

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My husband and I took a motorcycle ride to visit great local knitting store yesterday.  The store is called The Knitters Edge and it is located in Bethlehem, PA.  This is a great place to purchase yarn and knitting supplies and hang out with others that share your knitting and crocheting passion.  At the Knitters Edge the staff is very friendly and helpful, there is a wonderful, cozy, welcoming couch area with windows for individual knitting and crocheting (you can see it in the photo below).  They also offer a large variety of knitting and crocheting classes for beginners to advanced.

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During this weekend I also completed a baby blanket for my niece.  She is having a baby boy in August.  The pattern is from Lion Brand and I used a pound of love yarn from Lion brand.  The basket weave stitch pattern was a simple and pretty, a great project when you are on the go and can’t check a pattern.  You can just stitch away.

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I also started and finished a baby bib.  The pattern was free from the Bernat website located at http://www.bernat.com.  The name of the pattern is called Every Day set.  The bib is made with Sugar n Cream variegated blue yarn from my stash.  It was a good yarn to try out the pattern but I decided I wanted a softer yarn.  I found what I needed at the Knitters Edge.  While I was at The Knitters Edge I picked up some more yarn to make more bibs for my niece, my new grandson, and charity.  I picked up Whitney yarn made by Plymouth Yarn.  This yarn is soft and crochet’s up nice. 

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Neaten up those edges!

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The edges of our projects are called selvedges. The selvedge is the top, bottom, left, and right of your project. Where ever the knitted fabric ends. The cast on and cast off row are selvedges as well as each end of your rows as you work. Selvedges can be seamed together and not visible, but many are visible and need to be attractively stitched which requires even stitches, and some selvedges are stitched in a decorative pattern to become part of the look of the finished project. The selvedge is an important component to the success of any knitted fabric. A problem can occur when these stitches become distorted, either too tight or too loose.

Poor cast off stitch

Poor cast off stitch

Poor tension on edge

Poor tension on edge

The good news is selvedge stitches are pretty easy to correct. The knitter must be aware of possible problems at the start and as they approach the end of a row. Being aware of a potential problem is very instrumental in the success of correcting it.

Knit stiches take less yarn than purl stitches. So when completing a knit row and starting the next row with a purl stitch the knitter must make provisions for that extra yarn. This extra yarn can work its way into the stitches before or following it. Holding the yarn tighter for the first and last stitch will help. Give a little tug after wrapping the yarn to make your stitch, than complete the stitch. Another excellent way to fix the selvedge edge tension problem is to wrap your purl yarn from the bottom rather than the top of the stitch. You must make your knit stich on the next row in the back loop of the stitch rather than the front loop of the stitch.

The first and last cast off stitches tends to get enlarged. To make the corner selvedge stitch is even let’s start working on the first cast off stitch. After making the stitch normally give a little tug before making the next knit stitch and passing the first stitch over the second. When working the last cast off stitch, when there is only one stitch remaining on the left needle, pick up the stitch on the previous row under the stich on the right needle, complete a normal knit stitch through both loops on the left hand needle, then pass the stitch on the right over the one on the left. This neatens up the last cast off stitch. The last cast off stitch is the most difficult stitch to make uniform.

Here is an example of good selvedge edges (well, as good as I can get them).

Better tension on edge

Better tension on edge

Better cast off stitch

Better cast off stitch

What techniques would you like me to post next?

NY Giants Hat

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Donald Juniors NY Giants Hat

Donald Juniors NY Giants Hat

Our Passions in life

To have a fulfilling life it is helpful to be passionate about something. Passionate people have purpose and their passion generates energy. My passions are my faith, family, the art of business, and fiber arts. My son-in-law and his family have many passions and one of them is their love for sports and their allegiance to their teams. My grandson is no exception. He loves NY Giants so I embarked on designing a hat for him. You can find my free pattern on my patterns page. You can change the colors to the recipients favorite team. I got the patch from a seller on e-bay.

The Past and The Present

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Knitting, reading, technology, Oh My!

Knitting, reading, technology.

The Past and the Present

Technology, knitting, and reading, these are three of my favorite hobbies.  It is exciting to enjoy each one for very different reasons.  They balance each other, when technology gets overwhelming, a simple knitting project can be calming.  Reading connects them all together.  I enjoy reading; I like fiction and books about my hobbies.  I love reading knitting books that are fiction, technical, and tid-bits of helpful information about my craft.  I enjoy reading about business with a focus on technology, how to’s, how processes are applied to solve a problem, and new discoveries and how it I can use them in my life.

Knitting connects us to our past.  Men and women have been knitting throughout history.  In the past knitting was a career, these careers provided a resource for men supported their families.  Knitting was a career that required proficient work and was achieved through a comprehensive apprentice program.  As time progressed knitting was done by women to provide for their families and the military.  And knitting evolved into a hobby, providing hobbyists the ability to make something from a ball of yarn, camaraderie with other knitters, therapy in many forms, the ability to give warm comforting items to people in need, and last but definitely not least stress relief.

Technology and knitting have become great buddies.  Knitters have recently discovered through the advancement of technology, they can learn more; see videos to succeed in a specific techniques, communicate with other knitters worldwide, make “virtual” knitting friends, and achieve much more than possible before technology brought our world a little closer.

Reading knitting fiction and technical books brings knitters together, communicates valuable ideas and life styles that include knitting.  I have been using the book pictured “The Knitters Life List”, by Gwen W. Steege as a tool and kind of diary of my knitting journey.  This book is very interesting.  There are profiles of well-known knitters, techniques discussed, suggestions of what and how to apply knitting to our lives and interesting things to learn.

Enjoying all the aspects of all of our hobbies makes us well rounded, knowledgeable knitters.  Whatever your passion, whatever you love to do, whatever makes you lose track of time because you are engrossed in what you are doing, is what you should study, enjoy, seek out, and grow in.  So please share – what is your passion?

Let’s make 2012 an opportunity to reflect and choose to advance in what we love.

Don’t waste another day!

Swatch #7

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On swatch number 7 we are learning SSK decreases. The SSK goes on the right side of your work because it mirrors the K2tog which is worked on the left side, normally. These two decreases mirror themselves and look the best when trying to avoid any attention to your decreases. For the Masters program we have questions to answer about this swatch and we need to write up an instruction sheet to make an SSK properly that is easy to follow. Being able to explain techniques is a good skill to learn.

Level 1 swatch 7

Level 1 swatch 7

I am also working on a scarf for a dear friend. She loves blue, I love the yarn, I am using Lion Brands Natures’s Choice organic cotton. I am developing my own simple pattern. I will post a picture of the completed scarf and instructions upon completion of the scarf. Here is my work in progress.

Special Blue and almond scarf

Special Blue and almond scarf

This weekend we were camping at Hickory Run State Park in Albrightsville PA. I knitted the scarf a lot while I was there. I love knitting outside. I am inspired by the color and vibrancy of the woods. It was very relaxing and enjoyable.